Archive | Lillian Bush Ogilvie RSS feed for this section

Genevieve Leoline (Bush) Paul

6 May

After being orphaned at 14, widowed with two small children at  30, watching her younger brother die of drug abuse, potentially surviving tuberculosis thereafter, and losing one of her daughters prematurely to cancer, this beautiful lady lived to be 85-years-old. She’s a survivor if I ever saw one, and I couldn’t be happier to call her my great-great grandmother.

Genevieve Bush was born in Smethport, Pennsylvania on August 12 1866 to Hiram M. Bush and Sarah Douglas Bush. She had two sisters, Lillian M. (the oldest), and Inestine C. (the youngest), and one brother Lionel (known as Lee). Her father Hiram worked as a lumberman and a farmer, and according to a very informative obituary written by Lillian for her brother Lionel, the Bush’s owned the flour mill and lumber mill in Smethport for a “good many years.” After her mother Sarah died around 1876, Hiram re-married at some point and the family continued to live in Smethport until his death a few years later on approximately Dec. 14, 1880, as seen in this Dec. 16, 1880 listing in the McKean County Miner.

Shortly before his death the 1880 census shows the entire Bush clan (minus Sarah) with Genevieve listed under the nickname Eva. This is the first and last time I’ve heard her called this. Interestingly enough, there is also a border by the name of Frank Ogilvie living with the Bush’s, who will later marry Genevieve’s sister Lillian.

Due to the lack of census data from 1890, the whereabouts of Genevieve and her siblings is hard to track after 1880, but not as difficult as it could’ve been thanks to the aforementioned obituary from 1898 written by Lillian about their brother, his struggles, and most interestingly the movement of each sister after their father’s death. Though it’s difficult to read, and we must take it’s accuracy with a grain of salt, this article gives many clues into the lives of the Bush sisters and their brother between 1880 and 1898.

According to Lillian, after their father’s death all three sisters and their brother went to Hamilton, New York to live with their “mother’s people” for about two years. Then, Lillian married Frank Ogilvie and they all returned to Smethport for a time and lived with them. In what could potentially be 1889 (it’s difficult to read), they all went to live in Washington Territory. Inestine had married Hugh J. Hamilton at that point, and Genevieve and Lee were the under the guardianship of a man by the name of William Haskell (connection to be determined). Genevieve asked to take charge of Lee, and according to Lillian he lived with her most of the time.

Genevieve at some point married John Charles Fremont Paul (a very difficult man to find) of Oakville, Washington (but born in Iowa). They had two children, Ethel, born in 1892, and Genevieve, born in 1896. Sadly, he died in 1896, the same year Genevieve was born. Family rumor had it down as a logging accident, but on the death index he’s listed as a farmer, and his cause of death was a “cerebral tumor.” We’ll talk more about him someday soon.

Shortly after John’s death, Lee was said to have come back to live with Genevieve, and was looking forward to moving with her and her daughters to Colorado Springs, where she was planning to go in the beginning of 1899 for health reasons. According to Lillian’s meanderings in Lee’s obituary she was at the time of his death in very poor health, presumably with tuberculosis.

By 1900 Genevieve Paul was living in Colorado Springs with her two daughters, along with her sister Lillian and brother-in-law Frank Ogilvie at a house on Colorado Avenue.

She’s listed on this census as an artist, which her sister Lillian had also mentioned in Lee’s obituary. This is well-known amongst our family members. In fact, two of her paintings hung at my Grandparents house for as long as any of us can remember. Recently, we discovered the one above the mantel was listed as a wedding present to my grandparents from her in their wedding gift log.

In 1910, she was living with her 13-year-old daughter Genevieve at a house on 616 West Platte Avenue in Colorado Springs. It’s hard to read what her profession was in this census, but she was working at home.

By 1920, her daughter Genevieve and husband Samuel Earnest Norris (a local dentist, and my great grandpa) were living with her along with their three-month old son, Lawrence (my grandpa). Genevieve is listed as a seamstress in this record.

In 1930, and in the recently released 1940 census she was living in the same house on North Platte, though here in the 1940 census the address is listed incorrectly as being on North Chestnut. This made it a bit of a challenge to find during my initial search of the 1940 census before it was indexed. She’s 73-years-old in this census record, which was taken the same year as the wonderful photograph at the top of this page.

In this photo of her from 1950, she’s celebrating her 84th birthday. We’re not sure who the girl on the far left is, but the other people in this photograph from left to right are her sister Inestine (Bush) Roberts, her granddaughter Lorraine(Essick) Crocker, her granddaughter Barbara (Norris) Shupe holding her great-grandson Bo, her daughter Ethel (Paul) Essick, and her granddaughter-in-law Dora (Collins) Norris (my grandma). The two girls right behind her are her great-granddaughters Vivalee and JoAnne.

She passed away the next year at 85-years-old. Note, the city of Smithport, PA is listed as her birthplace in the obituary below. This is also true in an article I’ll share about her sister Inestine’s death on Pikes Peak. It was only in searching for Smithport, and realizing there was no Smithport, that I tracked them to Smethport where I found a wealth of information about the well-known Bush family.

%d bloggers like this: